skip to Main Content

Max Planck Society Newsroom report: Culture shapes the brain

How reading changes the way we think APRIL 20, 2018 From a research perspective, reading and writing is a fascinating phenomenon. After all, the first writing systems date back less than 6,000 years – the blink of an eye in the timescale of human evolution. How the human brain is nonetheless able to master this complex task is a key question. Current topics of scientific interest include exploring the differences between practised readers and illiterate individuals - and the consequences…

Read More

Out in eLife, Nieuwland et al: Large-scale replication study reveals a limit on probabilistic prediction in language comprehension

Do people routinely pre-activate the meaning and even the phonological form of upcoming words? The most acclaimed evidence for phonological prediction comes from a 2005 Nature Neuroscience publication by DeLong, Urbach and Kutas, who observed a graded modulation of electrical brain potentials (N400) to nouns and preceding articles by the probability that people use a word to continue the sentence fragment (‘cloze’). In our direct replication study spanning 9 laboratories (N=334), pre-registered replication-analyses and exploratory Bayes factor analyses successfully replicated…

Read More

How research with adult illiterates can inform dyslexia research

We have written an opinion article in the journal Language, Cognition and Neuroscience on  how research with adult illiterates can inform dyslexia research. Here's the link to the open access article: Distinguishing cause from effect – many deficits associated with developmental dyslexia may be a consequence of reduced and suboptimal reading experience

Read More

Talk at Bridging Attention and Prediction workshop in Barcelona, BAP 2018

http://www.ub.edu/bridgingattentionprediction/content/two-systems-account-predictive-processing A two-systems account of predictive processing Falk Huettig Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics I will present a mechanistic two-systems account of prediction. I will argue that predictive processing can be broadly divided into passive and active mechanisms influencing pre-activation of upcoming input. Passive mechanisms include associations (at all levels from phonetic/phonological to event structures), resting state level dynamics, structure repetition, regularity detection, and sharpening/fine-tuning of perceptual/cognitive structures and procedures. Active mechanisms include reasoning (logical inference, 'linguistic discourse processing', etc.),…

Read More

Falk Huettig gives keynote talk at AMLaP Asia in Hyderabad

https://amlap2018asia.wordpress.com How learning to read changes mind and brain Abstract: Reading as a recent cultural invention has not been shaped by evolutionary processes and thus must make use of cognitive systems and brain networks which are either domain-general or have evolved for other purposes. Research on the effect of literacy thus is a powerful tool to investigate how cultural inventions impact on cognition and brain functioning. During my talk, will draw on evidence from both behavioural experiments and neurobiological studies.…

Read More

Accepted in JEP:LMC: Ostarek et al. ‘Saccade trajectories reveal dynamic interactions …’

Abstract: Implicit up/down words, such as bird and foot, systematically influence performance on visual tasks involving immediately following targets in compatible vs. incompatible locations. Recent studies have observed that the semantic relation between prime words and target pictures can strongly influence the size and even the direction of the effect: Semantically related targets are processed faster in congruent vs. incongruent locations (location-specific priming), whereas unrelated targets are processed slower in congruent locations. Here, we used eye-tracking to investigate the moment-to-moment…

Read More
Search